• Hot Country 92.1 FM

Be Careful Capturing That Perfect Photo


It should be pretty obvious that, if you're in a museum, you keep your hands -- and butt -- to yourself.

One such tourist did not get the memo and now a 215-year-old sculpture is now a little worse for wear.

The New York Times reports that the incident happened last week at the Gypsotheca Antonio Canova museum in Northern Italy, where a man decided to sit on the plaster sculpture of a relaxed Pauline Bonaparte -- Napoleon's little sister -- otherwise known as the 1805 work of art "Venus Vitrix."

The 19th century sculpture was made by Antonio Canova, the same person who created the famed "Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss" and "Perseus Triumphant" sculptures that you see on a lot of history books or wine labels.

Well, for "Venus Vitrix," it's a statue of a naked woman styled after Bonaparte's little sis reclining on a sofa and this tourist decided to recreate the pose... on the statue.

Yes, a tourist climbed on a famous sculpture and laid down on it all for a funny photo. As it turns out, that photo op turned into an expensive gaffe because, when the he got back on his feet, he realized he snapped off some of the statue's toes.

Instead of letting museum staff know of his mistake, he and his wife booked it out of the museum thinking they got away with it. Well, in the year 2020, there are cameras everywhere so it was all caught on film and he was tracked down pretty quickly.

Now, the man might face charges from an Italian court and the museum definitely wants him punished.

Thankfully, the marble counterpart of the damaged plaster model is safely tucked away in a gallery in Rome -- and, as far as we know, it still has its toes.

EEO REPORT

PUBLIC FILE 

PRIVACY POLICY

ADVERTISE WITH US

ASSISTANCE WITH PUBLIC FILE

Persons with disabilities needing assistance with public inspection file content should contact Jim Medley, 920-682-0351or jimmedley@womtradio.com

© 2020 BY SEEHAFER BROADCASTING CORP.